A Farewell

After releasing three great volumes I am sorry to announce that Inky Path is closing its doors.

Inky started off as little more than a dream, and with the help of my amazing editors and an immense amount of support from the interactive fiction community, Inky grew into a great mag showcasing interactive fiction for both the IF community and those outside of IF. Inky Path began with two main goals–connecting the IF community and the outside world, and bringing different forms of IF together under one roof. And I think Inky succeeded in that goal, its volumes knitting together different interactive fiction and presenting IF as work of literary value. It was an experiment, and I’d like to think that it succeeded.

Inky Path was a great experience, and I’d like to once again thank everyone who helped make this possible, including a special shout-out to our contributors. Without you all, we wouldn’t have a magazine! I would also like to thank astounding editors Reagan Neviska, Irene Enlow, and Lia Lewine, who brought this mag to life and stuck with me through thick and thin.

And just because the mag is over doesn’t mean there isn’t anything else left in store. We’ll still be updating the blog occasionally to keep up with the latest IF news. And I’ll still be around the IF community, perhaps cooking up some new IF experiments.

Thank you once more, and farewell for now.

 

Sincerely,

Devi Acharya

Editor-in-Chief

 

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Remember DestinyQuest Infinite? Well this gamebook is nearing the end of its production, and seeking beta testers to help squash whatever bugs might remain. The perks include a free copy of Act I of DestinyQuest, your name on DQI’s site, and of course a chance to play this great gamebook before anyone else (and that means bragging rights.)

From the creators:

 

Development for our digital gamebook DestinyQuest Infinite is nearing an end, and we’re ready to squash some pesky last bugs and put a polish on the user experience. Whether you’ve been a gamebook fan since you were a kid or you’ve never even heard of the genre before, we want to make sure DQI is fun to play and easy to understand.

Now we need some help: we’re looking for testers for our game-meets-book.  We’re interested in people from different walks of life and different levels of experience with gamebooks.

To apply, anyone interested just needs to fill out this form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1EbojbIRTpgItDHpX70v-Tj65FHOuiXZbMCVZjAsiv5c/viewform We’ll then select a handful of people to test with.

You can find more information about DestinyQuest Infinite on our website www.destinyquestinfinite.com or by following us on Twitter @QuestForge.

Below is some additional information:

 

Testers will:

Play through the Prologue and one quest of DestinyQuest Infinite in a Skype session. (This should only take about 30 minutes).

Share your thoughts as they play: what’s good, what’t bad, what’s confusing.

We’ll do the rest! There is no technical knowhow or previous experience required.

 

As a way of saying thanks, testers will receive:

A free copy of Act 1 of DestinyQuest Infinite when it becomes available.

A listing of their  name (or nickname) on our website.

A chance to play DestinyQuest Infinite before anyone else!

 

Again, the form is located at this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1EbojbIRTpgItDHpX70v-Tj65FHOuiXZbMCVZjAsiv5c/viewform . We’d appreciate if you spread the news.

 

Thanks!

 

New Release: Heavy Metal Thunder

Cubus Games (creator of The Sinister Fairground) has just released their new interactive fiction piece, Heavy Metal Thunder. As described by the creators, “Heavy Metal Thunder places its readers at the core of an interstellar struggle against alien invaders, requiring immensely difficult and exciting choices to be made as the narrative grows, expands and twists.” 

If you’re looking for an awesome new gamebook for iOS, Heavy Metal Thunder might be just what you’re looking for.

Website: http://www.cubusgames.com/heavy-metal-thunder

Gameplay Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMbobtp4OjU

Volume 1.3 Released!

We at Inky Path are pleased to present Inky’s third volume, “Hidden in Shadows.” 

inky_cover3

 

Featuring five interactive pieces of different sizes and shapes, this volume highlights works that hide below the surface. Whether about a secret society or a thousand past lives, these pieces will leave you wondering about the history behind them and all the potential futures to unfurl. 

We also bring you a parser-based interactive in which the worlds of these stories are brought to life. 

Have fun, explore, but always be wary–things are not always as they seem.

Click here to read Vol. 1.3

Other Interactives Pt. 1 — Blindscape

blindWe all know and love interactive fiction, but there are other ways to create a compelling, interactive, narrative-driven story without hyperlinks or a parser.

Blindscape is an experimental narrative featuring a blind narrator in a dystopic world.

Interact with the environment through sound and touch, and escape from the life you lead. Although the game is relatively short it is an impactful tale with some great audio (and apparently stunning 3D graphics as well) that is well worth a look and a listen.

Available on Google Play or the App Store

Editing Opportunities Abound!

If you’re looking to get involved in the lit mag world, look no further! There are lots of opportunities to get involved and stay involved.

Asymptote is currently recruiting volunteers for several positions on a rolling basis–Communications Manager, Marketing Manager, Graphic Designer, Director of Outreach, English Social Media Manager, Video Production Assistant and Business Developer.

Siblini has staff openings for some of its senior positions and is also looking for members to join its new blog team (more details on that soon). If you’re interested in working with young adults and addressing that audience, Siblini is the place for you.

Today is the last day to apply for n+1’s Deputy Managing Editor position. You can help assist with running the magazine and keeping things running smoothly.

Good luck!

From Story Papers to CYOA: An Interview with Demian Katz on VuPop

In case you missed it, Villanova University hosted VuPop, a conference on interactive fiction featuring some great speakers discussing everything from gender in historical fiction to bioethics awareness. Demian Katz discusses the conference, noting the highlights and reflecting on what went well and future possibilities.

Why Villanova University? What is the brief history of VuPop?

VuPop started in 2013 after a forgotten collection of dime novels was rediscovered in the basement of Villanova University’s Falvey Memorial Library. This seemed like a good excuse to begin a series of events highlighting interesting areas of popular culture worthy of deeper academic study. The second year’s topic was chosen as gamebooks simply because it happens to be my area of expertise; next year’s will look at 3-D technology in entertainment to tie in to the installation of a CAVE system in the library.

What were some of the highlights from VuPop?

Attendees at VuPop were rewarded for their travels with some nice give-aways courtesy of ChooseCo and Tin Man Games – not bad for a completely free event. Some of the day’s presentations offered solid overviews of several areas of interactive fiction: gamebooks, electronic adventure games, and visual novels. The remainder were either inspirational – Chris Liu’s talk on special considerations for writing interactively, and Randy Cook’s reflections on the power of the form – or more specialized – Rebecca Slitt’s look at handling gender in historical interactive fiction, and David Perlman’s discussion of utilizing interactive fiction for educational purposes, specifically in the area of bioethics. Many talks prompted some good audience questions, and all had something interesting to offer both the veteran and the newcomer. This was capped off with a live reading of my new gamebook, The Groom of the Tomb, which went a long way toward reassuring me that the book is actually fun to play, and an informal game night that offered opportunities for attendees and speakers to get to know each other better. Given the extremely specialized nature of this event, it’s unlikely that Villanova would ever repeat it – but I’d love to see something similar happen again in another venue.

The schedule of events mentions a Special Collections Tour. What did that involve?

Since some people were traveling some distance to the event, we wanted to extend our hospitality for an extra day to those who were interested. Thus, we offered the option for people to get a tour of the library’s Special Collections department, where we keep all of our rarest materials. We don’t have much in the way of interactive fiction (the IF exhibit currently on display in the library for the summer term comes largely from my personal collection), but many of our other popular culture materials help show the evolution of genres that eventually became interactive. It’s hard to look at a turn-of-the-20th-century children’s story paper without seeing many of the same themes that would populate the Choose Your Own Adventure books a century later. To demonstrate the library’s digitization efforts, we also gave a tour of our scanning lab, where we scanned an issue of “Happy Days” (one of the aforementioned story papers) which is now available online: http://digital.library.villanova.edu/Item/vudl:351596

How did you feel about how VuPop went? What was done well, and what do you think could be improved?

I was extremely pleased with the content of VuPop, and I really enjoyed meeting the various people who attended. My biggest disappointment is simply that we didn’t get as many attendees as I would have hoped – we could have accommodated a great many more. Obviously this is a function of timing and location – an event in the city and/or on the weekend would likely have been a greater draw – but I hope that the online video has allowed a wider audience to enjoy at least some portions of the event.

Anything else that you’d like to add?

As of this writing, you can still watch the afternoon sessions through the “streaming now” link at http://vupop.org, and I’m working to get these videos (plus recordings of the morning) available more permanently somewhere. Stay tuned for more details!