Remember DestinyQuest Infinite? Well this gamebook is nearing the end of its production, and seeking beta testers to help squash whatever bugs might remain. The perks include a free copy of Act I of DestinyQuest, your name on DQI’s site, and of course a chance to play this great gamebook before anyone else (and that means bragging rights.)

From the creators:

 

Development for our digital gamebook DestinyQuest Infinite is nearing an end, and we’re ready to squash some pesky last bugs and put a polish on the user experience. Whether you’ve been a gamebook fan since you were a kid or you’ve never even heard of the genre before, we want to make sure DQI is fun to play and easy to understand.

Now we need some help: we’re looking for testers for our game-meets-book.  We’re interested in people from different walks of life and different levels of experience with gamebooks.

To apply, anyone interested just needs to fill out this form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1EbojbIRTpgItDHpX70v-Tj65FHOuiXZbMCVZjAsiv5c/viewform We’ll then select a handful of people to test with.

You can find more information about DestinyQuest Infinite on our website www.destinyquestinfinite.com or by following us on Twitter @QuestForge.

Below is some additional information:

 

Testers will:

Play through the Prologue and one quest of DestinyQuest Infinite in a Skype session. (This should only take about 30 minutes).

Share your thoughts as they play: what’s good, what’t bad, what’s confusing.

We’ll do the rest! There is no technical knowhow or previous experience required.

 

As a way of saying thanks, testers will receive:

A free copy of Act 1 of DestinyQuest Infinite when it becomes available.

A listing of their  name (or nickname) on our website.

A chance to play DestinyQuest Infinite before anyone else!

 

Again, the form is located at this link: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1EbojbIRTpgItDHpX70v-Tj65FHOuiXZbMCVZjAsiv5c/viewform . We’d appreciate if you spread the news.

 

Thanks!

 

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Seducing the Gamebook Community: Interview with Cubus Games


In this interview with Cubus Games, Quim Garreta discusses the company’s goal to create great gamebooks for both those who love gamebooks already and those who might be new to this type of storytelling. Their first release, The Sinister Fairground, is now available!

First of all, can you tell be a bit about the background for Cubus Games? How did it get started, and where is it now?

All of the members of Cubus Games have a “freaky” past: RPGs (The Lord of The Rings, Call of Cthulhu, Deadlands, Stormbringer, Star Wars, Dungeons & Dragons, etc), computer
games (all from Amstrad CPC, Spectrum, and PC later), tabletop games (Hero Quest!), Choose Your Own Adventure gamebooks… and stuff like these for many many years. A couple of years ago, we started making an amateur prototype of a gamebook app for Android devices. The results were so good, so we decided to go further and make the project professional. Now, we are a startup based near Barcelona, with the first gamebook app released in the AppStore: “The Sinister Fairground.” Another one is coming soon: “Heavy Metal Thunder” by Kyle B.Stiff.

As co-founder, what is your role in Cubus Games? What does a typical day look like for you?

Communication and marketing are my main tasks. I’m always searching for new ways to introduce our gamebooks to new readers. Searching for talented artists who want to participate in the gamebook apps development. I also compose the music to take this reading/gaming experience to another level.

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Tell me about some of the other members of the Cubus Games team. Are your works collaborations or are various writers/illustrators on staff?

Both. Jaume, our art&content director, is a gamebook expert, illustrator, writer… and philosopher! Jordi is designer, developer, photographer and musician. So we can develop a gamebook app by ourselves. However, we have great collaborators with us.

What goes into gamebook development from your end? What kind of surprises have you found along the way?

We are just at the very beginning of our journey, but we have already learnt lots of amazing things and have met great people. However, I’ll answer this question when Cubus Games has three or four apps released in the market! 😉

What do you think sets the work of Cubus Games apart from other gamebook developers?

We could say that a good gamebook must have “intensity in the experience,” and all the features (music, illustrations, design) and system tools are there to help it. We try to follow this premise, but also the simplicity is very important in order to make the experience of reading/playing much more “user-friendly.” We would like to seduce non-gamebook readers as well. We also focus on the music more than anyone.

Your gamebooks can be read in English or Spanish. What effect do you think this has had on gamebook development or your audience?

We are lucky to be from Barcelona, so we can speak Catalan, Spanish and English. The gamebook world is mainly English, so it’s a must to be present in English. However, the Spanish speakers community is also huge, and people like to read in their mother tongue, so we think it’s very interesting to have the possibility to switch between different languages.

Tell me about your recent release, The Sinister Fairground. How did it come into being? How is it currently doing?

We met some great people from Nocte (Spanish Horror Writers Association). They had released a paper gamebook called “In the Sinister Fairground” and got in touch with us. We found it very interesting to adapt that book to the app format, so we wanted to start the Cubus Games gamebook app series with that adventure. The Sinister Fairground has been a good first step to get into the interactive storytelling developers.

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Where do you see Cubus Games in the future?

Our dream is to see Cubus Games among the greatest ones in the world of gamebook app developers. We want to participate with all of them in making this genre grow. We would like to seduce the gamebook community but also the people who might like gamebooks but don’t know it yet.

Do you have anything else you’d like to add?

We would like to thank all the people that are collaborating with us, one way or another. From gamebook experts and legends, to normal people, old and new friends, writers, illustrators, fans, beta-testers, etc.

Anyone who wants can support Cubus Games joining our Gamebook Community (it’s only a click from http://www.cubusgames.com). We’d like to listen to our audience, to know about their experiences with our gamebook apps, and to improve our product in every release.

If people check our first releases from the AppStore and gives feedback to us, we’ll be able to help the gamebook world get bigger.

 

 

Inform Updates, Pulp Mag Cover Generator, Gamebook Adventures and More!

We’ve been quiet, but that’s because we’ve been busy pulling together the finishing touches to our lovely second volume!Mark your calendars, put sticky notes on your sundials, and prepare yourselves for the May 31 release of Vol. 1.2. 

Pulp-O-Mizer_Cover_Image Looking to read some interesting new IF? Hoping to pull together a cover for a publication? The marvelous Thrilling Tales of the Downright Unusual has got you covered. I mean, who wouldn’t want to read The Toaster With Two Brains? That’s what I thought. The astounding Pulp Magazine Cover Generator also lets you customize your own lovely-looking poster like the one on your left, there, and you can even have your custom image printed on various household items!

If one IF piece isn’t enough, Gamebook Adventures has many more pieces to choose from of many sizes and flavors. Check them out!

Storium is also looking to tell stories, though in strange, new ways. This article calls Storium a “web based card game inspired by ideas from pen and paper RPGs” where players collaborate online to tell stories. It is currently being crowdfunded, with $10 minimum granting access to the game’s beta. 

Changes are also abound in the IF world. Inform has recently released a new version that cleans up some of the syntax and allows for even more flexibility when writing stories in various tenses and points of view. Although it may not be fully compatible with works previously made in Inform, it does show a lot of potential for experimental IF in the future.

In other news, Quest and textadventures.co.uk developer wrote up an annual review of his work, stating his work was “good, but not good enough.” He has now moved to working only part-time on these IF projects, stating that “I’m just not seeing the acceleration of change that I was expecting. I used to be convinced that interactive fiction could grow to become much more mainstream than it currently is, but now I’m not so sure at all.” 

Looking to work for a lit mag? The lovely folks at Transcendence are hoping to get some more prose readers for the new season. Email  transcendencemag@gmail.com if you are interested.

Updated Submission Guidelines, Parser vs Hypertext, and the Magical XYZZY!

It’s been a crazy last few weeks for interactive fiction! But first, the news on Inky…

Inky News

We’ve updated our submission guidelines, making them simpler and more streamlined to allow you to submit your piece rather than reading through long lists of guidelines. If you’re thinking of submitting to our second volume you’ve got 1 month left to get those pieces in.

Check out the submission guidelines here.

IF News

New developments are shaking the IF world. The results of the XYZZY Awards have been released along with a transcript of the ceremony. For those who don’t know, the Awards allow individuals to vote on the best IF Game, Writing, Puzzle, NPC, and other categories for all the games made that year.

Chris Klimas points out in his Storycade article that for the first time, a majority of the games were produced with Twine. Instead of this heralding an end to parser-based IF, however, he maintains that the increasing popularity of hypertext IF adds to the great wealth of IF that can be written and played and promotes a greater IF culture and community.

If you’re more interested in RPGs, Fail Forward offers some great links and reviews of tabletop and pen and paper RPGs including a clever review of Retrocasuality.